Daily Wisdom 188: Proverbs 10:2

Proverbs 10:2 (NKJV) — 2 Treasures of wickedness profit nothing, But righteousness delivers from death.

Empty treasures. All of the soft living and lavish spending of “the good life” purchased at the expense of wisdom is unprofitable. But righteousness, regardless of the presence or absence of the so-called good life on this earth, is profitable in the only area that matters: it delivers from death.

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Daily Wisdom 187: Proverbs 10:1

Proverbs 10:1 (NKJV) — 1 The proverbs of Solomon: A wise son makes a glad father, But a foolish son is the grief of his mother.

The source of parental gladness or sorrow. To a large degree, children are entrusted with their parents’ happiness. A father who has a wise son will be glad; a mother with a foolish son will be heavy with sorrow. Especially when they are young, children do not fully understand their influence on their parents’ emotional well-being. But when sons and daughters are older, when they are married and have their own families, they should recognize even then the importance of making their parents glad. If for no other reason than this, they should seek wisdom.

A man may, when his son is small, think of the boy’s future success, fame, or wealth. But as the years go by these things fade into insignificance, and he realizes that the most important quality his child could have is wisdom.

Sometimes, in their desperation for their children to be wise and avoid mistakes, parents will do unwise things and actually drive their children toward the very things they hope to help them avoid. A parent must find a delicate balance between protecting and guiding children and releasing the children. At some point, parents must be willing to release their children to make mistakes.

Nothing parents can do will guarantee their children will always make the right decisions. Even God, the perfect father, who had two children and placed them in a perfect environment, saw both of them fail. If He had never released them to fail, they would actually have been puppets, without the power of choice. The most powerful impact parents can have on children is the example they set before them. Formal teaching is of little value without the actual demonstration of what is taught.


The “Daily Wisdom” posts are drawn from my book Ancient Wisdom for Today’s World, a verse-by-verse commentary on the Book of Proverbs. This book was first published by Word Aflame Press in 1990, and it has been through six reprintings.

One pastor told me he required all graduates from the Christian school operated by the church he pastored to read this book. It has also been used for daily devotions. Since Proverbs has thirty-one chapters, if each day you read the chapter matching the day of the month, you will have read through the Book of Proverbs twelve times each year. When you do this, you begin to think in terms of the inspired wisdom found in this book.

You can read a free preview of the book by clicking below:

If you are interested in a hard copy, click on the link below:

https://pentecostalpublishing.com/products/proverbs-ancient-wisdom-for-todays-world

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Daily Wisdom 186: Proverbs 10

The tenth chapter of the Book of Proverbs begins the actual proverbs written or spoken by Solomon. The word proverb  means “to set, or place side by side” or “by comparison.” Contrast is used throughout the proverbs to demonstrate the difference between wisdom and folly.

What we read before this is Scripture, but not necessarily in proverbial form.

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Daily Wisdom 185: Proverbs 9:18

Proverbs 9:18 (NKJV) — 18 But he does not know that the dead are there, That her guests are in the depths of hell.

Folly’s guests. None of those in the house of folly can be said to be “living.” They are dead, the merest shadow of living people.

Before we were born again, we were “dead in trespasses and sins . . . fulfilling the desires of the flesh and of the mind, and were by nature children of wrath” (Ephesians 2:1, 3).

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“Leave the Oxen and Run”

Yesterday our pastor, Mitchell Bland of The Sanctuary UPC in Hazelwood, Missouri, preached a message titled “Leave the Oxen and Run.” It was a remarkable, soul-stirring message that brought me to tears.

The message is available on the church website at thesanctuaryupc.com, but I wanted to also post it here. The entire service is certainly worth viewing, but if you would like to go directly to Pastor Bland’s message, begin watching at 41:45.

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Daily Wisdom 184: Proverbs 9:17

Proverbs 9:17 (NKJV) — 17 “Stolen water is sweet, And bread eaten in secret is pleasant.”

Folly’s banquet. Wisdom offers meat and wine; folly offers bread and water. Wisdom invites openly to a well-furnished table; folly calls to a secret meal of the barest supply. Wisdom offers something full and satisfying; folly gives something that does not fill.

It is a trait of corrupt human nature to think forbidden things are attractive simply because they are unlawful. Such thrills soon lose their charm.

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Daily Wisdom 183: Proverbs 9:16

Proverbs 9:16 (NKJV) — 16 “Whoever is simple, let him turn in here”; And as for him who lacks understanding, she says to him,

Folly’s counterfeit invitation. Folly mimics wisdom, giving the same invitation. (See Proverbs 9:4.) Spiritually immature people find it hard to distinguish between good and evil, false and true, especially when their sensual appetite is aroused and sides with the temptress.

Hebrews 5:14 (NKJV) — 14 But solid food belongs to those who are of full age, that is, those who by reason of use have their senses exercised to discern both good and evil.

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“A Light in Darkness: Stories of Grief and Loss”

Today’s email from the Pentecostal Publishing House featured a new book, A Light in Darkness: Stories of Grief and Loss.

I recommend this book for those who are experiencing the grief that accompanies the loss of a loved one or other emotional trauma. The book originated with a volume composed by Norma Clanton that was distributed to ministers who had experienced the loss of a spouse. This new work includes additional contributions for a total of thirteen chapters.

Susan and I were thankful for the opportunity to participate in this project. Susan’s husband, Robert Fuller, passed away in 2008. My wife, Judy Segraves, died in 2011. Both of us understand the grief that accompanies loss, and we have experienced the deep emotional healing that comes from trusting God in our sorrow.

Scott Graham introduces the book in the video below:

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